Fuera de nuestras fronteras

DESTACADO
“Pokémón Go” y la problemática de P.I.
En un artículo de la Revista de la OMPI se examinan cuestiones de propiedad intelectual relacionadas con “”Pokémon Go”, el juego móvil más popular de toda la historia y cuyos personajes se esconden en los lugares más inesperados;  hace poco hicieron aparición en la propia OMPI.
—-  ————  ———-  ———–  ———-  ———-  ———–  ———–  ———  ———-  ———-
MARKMATTERS HOME  /  MONOPOLY ON “OPOLY”

Monopoly on “opoly”

Monopoly is the world famous game from Hasbro. A game so huge that it inspires people to make their own version. But Hasbro vigorously defends its game and trademarks. Like recently.

A company from Croatia has requested the trademark Drinkopoly in the European Union. Due to the different prefix, the trademarks are too different to base an opposition on risk of confusion. But Hasbro has to act, otherwise the suffix “opoly” will become diluted and it will be hard to defend its trademark. 

Claiming the reputation of the trademark is in these kind of cases a solution. Hasbro files the opposition and claims the dilution as well as the tarnishing of the trademark. And with success. The EUIPO recognizes the reputation and finds a link between the trademarks: it is likely that the consumer will associate the trademarks. Finally, the EUIPO is of the opinion that the trademark Drinkopoly is detrimental to the reputation of Monopoly, this caused by the reference to drinking games.

Interesting was the argument of Hasbro that the trademark was detrimental because of the inferior products. EUIPO rejects this argument as this argument is highly subjective. Moreover, this could be an argument for the Applicant stressing that the products are equal of quality of even better. “Therefore, in assessing whether use of the contested trademark is likely to damage the reputation of the earlier trademark, the Opposition Division can only consider the goods as indicated in the list for each trademark. The harmful effects of use of the contested sign for the goods applied for must derive from the nature and usual characteristics of the relevant goods in general.”

Finally EUIPO states that under Article 8(5) EUTMR, the proprietor of a reputed trademark is protected against the use of a similar trademark for goods and services of a comparable nature but obviously inferior quality. “The erosion of the high esteem and reputation enjoyed by the earlier trademark among the relevant public in such a case would mean that the public would associate the goods and services of inferior quality covered by the subsequent trademark with the earlier trademark, thus inferring a connection as regards commercial origin. Without such a connection, the inferior quality of the subsequent goods and services would not harm the high esteem enjoyed by the earlier trademark among its clientele. Therefore, without such a connection, detriment to the repute of the earlier trademark is not likely to occur. If, however, such a connection were to exist, it would inevitably mean that use of the contested trademark would take advantage of the reputation of the earlier trademark. Such advantage would necessarily be unfair because it is for the proprietor of the trademark with a reputation to exploit and benefit from such reputation. As a matter of principle, unauthorised parties may not exploit an earlier trademark’s reputation, regardless of whether or not the goods and services marketed under the subsequent mark are of inferior quality. In such a case, Article 8(5) EUTMR would apply, not because the inferior quality of the contested goods and services would be detrimental to the reputation of the earlier trademark, but because unfair advantage would be taken of the distinctive character or repute of the earlier trademark.”

Share1

Empresa china compra los derechos de la marca BlackBerry para teléfonos

Empresa china compra los derechos de la marca BlackBerry para teléfonos diciembre 16, 2016 BlackBerry informó en septiembre que dejaría de fabricar teléfonos móviles, pero ahora ha realizado un movimiento sorprendente en este sentido: ha vendido los derechos globales para usar su marca al fabricante chino TCL. Mientras la compañía canadiense se centrará en servicios y software, la empresa china podrá fabricar teléfonos usando su marca.

Encuentra más detalles en http://altadensidad.com/?p=95689

Aunque no hay ninguna información que indique de qué tipo de teléfonos estamos hablando. Por supuesto, serán Android, eso sí, ya que no tiene sentido seguir insistiendo en el que usaba la compañía hace años. Según el acuerdo, TCL diseñará, fabricará, venderá y ofrecerá soporte al cliente para dispositivos móviles de marca BlackBerry, mientras que BlackBerry participará con el software y los servicios. Es importante tener en cuenta que los dos últimos teléfonos de Blackberry, el Android DTEK50 y DTEK60, ya fueron fabricados por TCL utilizando partes previamente encontradas en el Alcatel Idol 4, por lo que parece que lo único que se perderá realmente es la batuta, las decisiones saldrán de la propia TCL. Origen: Empresa china compra los derechos de la marca BlackBerry para teléfonos

Encuentra más detalles en http://altadensidad.com/?p=95689

Instagram challenges Microsoft trademark application at TTAB over ‘gram’ suffix

By Steve Brachmann on Dec 09, 2016 01:15 pm
Instagram’s TTAB action targets U.S. Trademark Application No. 86663305, which would protect Microsoft’s use of the standard character mark “ACTIONGRAM” on goods including computer software for virtual reality realization, manipulation, immersion and integration of audio, video, text, binary, still images, graphics and multimedia files, as well as computer software for controlling wearable hardware and wearable computer peripherals. The application for this trademark was filed in June 2015. Microsoft is currently offering a beta version of Actiongram, a virtual reality service for Hololens users where users can create holograms which they can share with social contacts.

The post Instagram challenges Microsoft trademark application at TTAB over ‘gram’ suffix appeared first on IPWatchdog.com | Patents & Patent Law.
Read in browser »
share on Twitter Like Instagram challenges Microsoft trademark application at TTAB over ‘gram’ suffix on Facebook

Admissions that programming was commonly known doom patent owner in CBM appeal

By Robert Schaffer on Dec 09, 2016 09:30 am
The Federal Circuit affirmed the Board’s decision to invalidate certain claims in three patents owned by Ameranth. The Court relied heavily on Ameranth’s concessions within the specification that certain aspects of the invention were “typical” or “commonly known.” Practitioners should be wary of using such language and should take steps to identify specific technological improvements.

The post Admissions that programming was commonly known doom patent owner in CBM appeal appeared first on IPWatchdog.com | Patents & Patent Law.
Read in browser »
share on Twitter Like Admissions that programming was commonly known doom patent owner in CBM appeal on Facebook

L’Oreal targeted in patent infringement suit by CA-based startup over bond building hair treatment products

By Steve Brachmann on Dec 09, 2016 07:45 am
Olaplex argues that L’Oreal is profiting from technology it first came into contact with in 2015, when L’Oreal discussed a possible takeover with Olaplex. After seeing Olaplex’s proprietary technology, including an unpublished patent application and Olaplex’s marketing strategy, Olaplex alleges that L’Oreal ceased with its acquisition efforts after signing a non-disclosure agreement with Olaplex. About a year later, L’Oreal began selling a series of three hair treatment products infringing upon Olaplex’s intellectual property related to bond builders, according to reports.

The post L’Oreal targeted in patent infringement suit by CA-based startup over bond building hair treatment products appeared first on IPWatchdog.com | Patents & Patent Law.
Read in browser »
share on Twitter Like L’Oreal targeted in patent infringement suit by CA-based startup over bond building hair treatment products on Facebook

Supreme Court: Term ‘article of manufacture’ encompasses both a product sold to a consumer and a component of that product

By John M. Rogitz on Dec 09, 2016 06:00 am
The relatively short opinion by Supreme Court standards – just over eight pages – puts it simply: “The text resolves this case. The term ‘article of manufacture,’ as used in §289, encompasses both a product sold to a consumer and a component of that product.”

The post Supreme Court: Term ‘article of manufacture’ encompasses both a product sold to a consumer and a component of that product appeared first on IPWatchdog.com | Patents & Patent Law.
Read in browser »
share on Twitter Like Supreme Court: Term ‘article of manufacture’ encompasses both a product sold to a consumer and a component of that product on Facebook

Squire Patton Boggs expands Frankfurt Office with trio from WilmerHale

By Press Releases on Dec 09, 2016 05:15 am
Squire Patton Boggs has appointed a three-partner team from WilmerHale in Frankfurt, to focus on brand management. Reinhart Lange, Dr. Christofer Eggers and Eva Schalast, all highly regarded for their expertise in intellectual property and competition disputes, have joined the firm along with a five-strong brand management team.

The post Squire Patton Boggs expands Frankfurt Office with trio from WilmerHaleappeared first on IPWatchdog.com | Patents & Patent Law.
Read in browser »
share on Twitter Like Squire Patton Boggs expands Frankfurt Office with trio from WilmerHale on Facebook

Facebook news feed promotes fake news, creates misleading expectations in readers

By Steve Brachmann on Sep 17, 2016 07:30 am

It is possible that the fake news topics in Trending News issue may get fixed for Facebook in the future; after all, algorithms tend to improve with time and greater access to data and Facebook has made an official comment that it will work to improve the Trending News algorithm’s ability to weed out fake and satirical stories. But this episode does highlight the fact that simply because content is trending online doesn’t mean that content is factually accurate. So-called “clickbait” articles are able to gain traction with user engagement by appealing to strong emotional responses in readers.

The post Facebook news feed promotes fake news, creates misleading expectations in readers appeared first on IPWatchdog.com | Patents & Patent Law.

Read in browser »
share on Twitter Like Facebook news feed promotes fake news, creates misleading expectations in readers on Facebook

 

May 24, 2016 – Patent Applications (Canada)

The number of patent applications published in 2015 or that entered national phase in Canada in 2015 was approximately the same as in 2014 at about 33,500 application. Smart & Biggar, Gowlings and BLG top the list of firms by volume of applications.

The number of applications filed without the services of an agent was down to 576 applications, approximately 1.7% of applications.

Because patent applications are not typically published for 18 months after they are filed, the data used for this report is based on applications published in 2015. Many of these applications were filed 18 months earlier, perhaps as early as 2013. For national phase entry applications, these are typically published shortly after entry into Canada but may have an international filing date 30 or even 42 months earlier.

For comparison, see a similar list for 2014. I have previously prepared similar lists for trademark applications.

IPPractice – Canadian Intellectual Property May 24, 2016

—————————————————-

05/05/2016 – Signos distintivos (España)

España se mantiene fuera de la denominada lista 301 de países vulneradores de derechos de Propiedad Industrial que publica EEUU

La oficina del representante de comercio de EEUU ha publicado el informe especial 301 correspondiente al año 2016, conocido como la lista 301. Este informe refleja la determinación de su administración para fomentar y mantener una protección y observancia adecuadas de los derechos de Propiedad Intelectual e Industrial (PI) en todo el mundo.

Se consideran significativas y positivas las acciones que España ha tomado en el año 2015 en materia legislativa y se insta a que España continúe su trabajo en esta materia, asegurando la asignación de los recursos adecuados para la aplicación de la ley y la eficacia de sus operaciones y acciones de sensibilización.

El Informe también incluye un párrafo sobre “retos de la protección de marcas utilizadas en nombres de dominio”. Los nombres de dominio en China, Dinamarca, Alemania, Países Bajos, España, Suecia, y Suiza han sido identificados, por titulares de derechos, como ineficaces o poco cooperativos. Adicionalmente se observa una falta de políticas de resolución de conflictos de nombres de dominio que sean transparentes y predecibles. Los Estados Unidos animan a sus socios comerciales a proporcionar procedimientos que permitan la protección de marcas comerciales utilizadas en los nombres de dominio y a asegurar que los procedimientos de resolución de conflictos estén disponibles para prevenir el mal uso de las marcas registradas.

Aunque España no aparece en el Informe de 2016, se sigue instando a que haya una especial observancia sobre la piratería de derechos de autor a través de Internet.

Más información: el documento completo se puede obtener en https://ustr.gov/sites/default/files/USTR-2016-Special-301-Report.pdf

Venezuela entra en la “lista negra” de la piratería

Acompañada de Argentina y Chile Integrar una “lista negra” casi nunca se lo toma uno como una buena noticia.  La Oficina de Comercio Exterior de Estados Unidos (USTR) publicó este miércoles su “Reporte Especial 301” sobre las violaciones de los derechos de propiedad intelectual y patentes a nivel mundial en temas tan variados como las películas pirata y las licencias farmacéuticas.

Autor: AlexLMX vía Shutterstock

servicio11

El informe incluye una “lista negra” con los 11 países que más piratean y una lista secundaria con aquellos 25 “a vigilar”.  En este contexto, tres países de América Latina aparecieron en la “lista negra”: Argentina, Chile y Venezuela. Ecuador, que había estado en esa categoría el año pasado, consiguió salir, pero igualmente apareció en la clasificación secundaria junto a otros 10 países de América Latina y el Caribe: Barbados, Bolivia, Brasil, Colombia, Costa Rica, República Dominicana, Guatemala, Jamaica, México y Perú. El “Reporte Especial 301” no conlleva sanciones por parte de EE.UU., pero supone un llamado de atención para que los países designados aumenten su esfuerzos en la lucha contra la piratería. Aunque no estén de acuerdo. Origen: Los 3 países de América Latina en la “lista negra” de la piratería (y uno logró salir) – BBC Mundo – Encuentra más contenido como este en http://altadensidad.com/?p=88325

Marcas

La protección de las marcas en los EE.UU. se logró en virtud de la cláusula de comercio de la Constitución de los EE.UU.  Hoy en día, las marcas están protegidas en el sistema federal de registro, codificado como Ley Lanham (Título 15, capítulo 22, del Código de los EE.UU.) y administrado por la USPTO, y en la legislación estatal.  Tanto las marcas registradas en el plano federal como las marcas registradas bajo el common law son susceptibles de protección en virtud de la Ley Lanham; sin embargo, el registro federal presenta algunas ventajas, pues por ejemplo en una demanda por infracción de marca considera como prueba la existencia de una marca protegible, lo que favorece a quien registró la marca.  La regulación federal sobre las marcas está recogida en el Título 37 del Código de Reglamentos Federales.  La legislación estatal de marcas, ya sea en forma de leyes adoptadas o de legislación del common law, variará según el estado y podrá clasificarse como ley de marcas o ley de competencia desleal.

La USPTO publica periódicamente el Trademark Manual of Examining Procedure (TMEP), que utilizan los abogados y examinadores de marcas.  El TMEP describe todas las leyes y reglamentos federales que deben seguirse para solicitar y mantener el registro de una marca en los EE.UU.  La USPTO también se encarga de las solicitudes de registro de marcas, tal y como se describe en el TMEP.  En el ámbito de las marcas no existen los equivalentes a los “agentes de patentes”, y por lo tanto deberá contratarse a un abogado para que preste asistencia con las solicitudes de registro de marca.

En la legislación federal de los EE.UU. se establece la diferencia entre las marcas de productos (utilizadas para distinguir un producto), las marcas de servicios (utilizadas para distinguir un servicio), las marcas colectivas (utilizadas para distinguir la pertenencia a un grupo, o a los productos o servicios producidos por un miembro del grupo), y las marcas de certificación (utilizadas para certificar que los productos o servicios cumplen las características definidas por el titular de la marca de certificación).  Las indicaciones geográficas pueden protegerse en el ámbito de las categorías anteriores, habitualmente como marcas de certificación.  La Ley Lanham protege todos los tipos de marca mencionados, al igual que los nombres de dominio, algunos nombres comerciales y algunas formas de apariencia distintiva.

A diferencia de otras formas de P.I., en lo referente a las marcas sí hay una coexistencia substancial entre las leyes federales y las estatales.  Además de lo estipulado en la Ley Lanham, cada estado tiene una legislación completa sobre las marcas, válida dentro de sus fronteras.  La mayoría de los estados tienen leyes estatales que se suman al common lawde competencia desleal, y muchos estados cuentan con reglamentos sobre marcas.  A nivel estatal, el aspecto más significativo de la legislación de marcas es que basta utilizar la marca sin haberla registrado para crear derechos de marca.

Patentes y modelos de utilidad

En los EE.UU., las patentes están autorizadas por la cláusula de patentes de la Constitución de los EE.UU.  Hasta hace poco, los EE.UU. usaron un sistema de patentes basado en el principio del primero en inventar, donde se determinaba la prioridad de las patentes o de las  solicitudes de patente que competían entre sí basándose en la fecha de invención.  La Ley de Invenciones de los EE.UU. llevó en 2013 a ese país al sistema más común basado en el principio del primero en presentar, donde la prioridad se basa en la fecha de solicitud.  El código de patentes forma parte del Título 35 del Código de los Estados Unidos.  En el plano federal, el sistema de patentes se regula en el Título 37 del Código de Reglamentos Federales.  Las patentes se rigen exclusivamente por el Derecho federal.

La USPTO publica periódicamente el Manual of Patent Examining Procedure (MPEP) que utilizan los abogados de patentes, los agentes y los examinadores.  El MPEP describe todas las leyes y los reglamentos que han de seguirse en el examen de las solicitudes de patentes en los EE.UU, e incluye citas de la jurisprudencia relevante.  La USPTO también se encarga de las solicitudes de patentes, tal y como se describe en el MPEP.  Aunque puede recurrirse a los abogados de patentes para ayudar con los procedimientos de solicitud, la USPTO tiene un examen de abogacía propio para los abogados de patentes.  Por ello hay “agentes de patentes” que, aun no siendo abogados, tienen potestad para ejercer ante la USPTO.

Pueden concederse tres tipos de patentes:

  • patentes de utilidad (para todo procedimiento, máquina, artículo manufacturado o composición de materia que sea novedoso, útil y no evidente, o toda mejora de los mismos que sea novedosa, útil y no evidente);
  • patentes de diseño (para todo diseño novedoso, original y ornamental de un artículo manufacturado);  y
  • patentes de plantas (para toda obtención vegetal distinta y nueva, de reproducción asexuada, excluidas las plantas multiplicadas por tubérculo).

Actualmente, el plazo de vigencia de una patente de invención es de 20 años a partir de la primera fecha de presentación de la solicitud, pero ese plazo puede prorrogarse para compensar las demoras que se den en la Oficina de Patentes o en la obtención de la aprobación de la FDA, al amparo de la Ley de Competencia en el Precio de los Medicamentos y Restablecimiento de los Plazos de Protección por Patente (denominada también Ley Hatch-Waxman).  La FDCA también tiene derechos similares al que confieren las patentes, en forma de exclusividades en el mercado, y bajo determinadas circunstancias, para los fabricantes de medicamentos de marca o genéricos.  Por ejemplo, en el mercado se concede exclusividad a los medicamentos huérfanos creados específicamente para tratar enfermedades raras, en virtud de la Ley de Medicamentos Huérfanos.

Bajo determinadas circunstancias, la legislación estadounidense concede un periodo de gracia de un año para presentar la solicitud después de una divulgación.  Por regla general, la primera divulgación debe hacerla el solicitante, o alguien que haya obtenido del solicitante el permiso de divulgación.

Entre los principales acuerdos internacionales que afectan a la legislación estadounidense sobre patentes cabe señalar los siguientes:

En la legislación estadounidense no se contempla la protección de los modelos de utilidad.

Derecho de autor

La protección por derecho de autor en los EE.UU. está recogida en la cláusula de derecho de autor de la Constitución de los EE.UU.  Las leyes vigentes del derecho de autor están codificadas en el Título 17 del Código de los Estados Unidos.  En el plano federal, la reglamentación relacionada con el derecho de autor se encuentra en el Título 37 del Código de Reglamentos Federales.  La ley federal sobre derecho de autor ha prevalecido sobre la mayor parte de la legislación estatal de derecho de autor desde 1978.

El derecho de autor se relaciona automáticamente con la creación de una obra original;  sin embargo, conviene efectuar el registro en la Oficina de Derecho de Autor, pues ello servirá de prueba del derecho de autor en caso de litigio y será necesario para obtener la compensación por daños y perjuicios en caso de infracción.  En muchos casos, el registro es necesario para demandar a un infractor, aunque el registro no altera la existencia de la protección del derecho de autor.

Los medios de enmascaramiento o los esquemas de trazado (topografías) de los circuitos integrados están protegidos por la legislación estadounidense sobre derecho de autor, si bien gozan de protección más limitada que otras obras susceptibles de ser protegidas por el derecho de autor.

La legislación estadounidense sobre el derecho de autor está basada en el concepto funcional de que el derecho de autor debe fomentar la creación de obras, más que proteger los derechos individuales del autor.  Esta finalidad del derecho de autor está establecida en la Constitución:  “promover el progreso de la ciencia y de las artes útiles”.  Así pues, los Estados Unidos solo reconocen un mínimo derecho moral de los autores como parte del derecho de autor.  Cuando se aplicó la Ley de Aplicación del Convenio de Berna, el Congreso de los EE.UU. declaró que los derechos morales recogidos en el artículo 6 bis estaban protegidos adecuadamente por leyes externas a la Ley de Derecho de Autor, como las que tratan la difamación, la competencia desleal y la publicidad [10]. La excepción está constituida por la Ley de Derechos de los Artistas Plásticos de 1990 (VARA), que forma parte de laLey de Derecho de Autor, pero solo se aplica a las obras de las artes plásticas y solo tiene en cuenta los derechos de atribución e integridad.  La legislación estadounidense no distingue entre el derecho de autor y los derechos conexos.

Entre los principales acuerdos internacionales relacionados con la legislación estadounidense del derecho de autor cabe señalar los siguientes:

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                        (Fuente:www.wipo.int)

 





P.O. Box 6106 Caracas 1010-A
Venezuela

Tel. (+58 212) 693 5012 - Fax. (+58 212) 693 6857 - E-Mail: info@uzurma.com - Web: www.uzurma.com
Copyright © 2008 - 2015